Rosalyn Carr – A Legacy of Equality & Diversity for All Girls

In 1949 M. Malisse Lockhart started the first Girl Scout troop for black students at Sumner School in Leavenworth, KS and set the stage for a life of giving and commitment to equality for her daughter, Rosalyn. This troop was ground breaking because it gave girls of color the same opportunity to be a Girl Scout as other girls in the community. Though Rosalyn wasn’t even born when that first troop started, the spark of service and commitment to equal opportunities was instilled in her since birth.

As Rosalyn experienced firsthand the transition from segregated school systems to integrated ones, she became the only black female in the school. Feeling out of place and not like everyone else, Rosalyn turned to Girl Scouts for a community. Even though she was still the only African American girl in the troop, she was a Girl Scout sister. Those early experiences set her up to become a proud alumna and supporter of Daisy’s Circle, to ensure girls of all races have equal opportunities to excel.

As an adult, Rosalyn Carr has continued to be passionate about giving. She followed in her mother’s footsteps by leading a Girl Scout troop in Topeka, KS. Troop 7217 is a Junior troop working on their leadership skills – something Rosalyn is especially dedicated to. “We are teaching them to think for themselves and not be followers,” Rosalyn said about her Junior Girl Scout troop. “Teamwork is a necessity, but we also celebrate their individuality.”

For Rosalyn, being part of Daisy’s Circle not only supports girls today and encourages acceptance of all races, religions and socioeconomic groups, it’s about connecting with her late mother. A legacy of service. Since Girl Scouts was a strong tie between the two, leading a troop and giving makes her feel like she’s making her mother proud. It’s amazing to see how the power of giving creates a lasting legacy.

We thank Rosalyn for her dedication to girls of all races and continued support of Girl Scouts! You can learn more about Rosalyn’s story by visiting our blog (www.gsksmoblog.org)!